Implanted microchip allows doctors access to database of patients' medical information

Bring_Harmony
Published on Aug 12, 2020
Jew, Doctor Scott Silverman applying the chip to a goy.

Delray Beach, Florida - 14 October 2004
1. Doctor with patient
2. Doctor implanting chip into patient's arm
3. Doctor activating chip
4. SOUNDBITE: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions, "It's put into a small glass...
5. VeriChip in package
6. Doctor with chip
7. Close up of doctor demonstrating scanner
8. SOUNDBITE: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions, "The chip itself does not...
9. NAT SOUND: VeriChip director of international marketing showing how scanner works
10. Computer screen showing his information
11. SOUNDBITE: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions, "And then once they have it...

File
12. Food and Drug Administration exteriors

Delray Beach, Florida - 14 October 2004
11. Close-up of scanner being shown

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14. VeriChip tag on wrist
15. Man getting access to home with chip
16. Computer screen showing access granted in home
17. VeriChip
17. VeriChip and scanner

SUGGESTED LEAD-IN:

The Food and Drug Administration said on Wednesday that the Florida-based company Applied Digital Solutions could market the VeriChip, an implantable computer chip about the size of a grain of rice, for storing medical information.

The VeriChip itself contains no medical records, just codes to a secure database that holds the patient's medical information, including allergies and prior treatment.

Ultimately, the company hopes patients who suffer from such ailments as diabetes and Alzheimer's or who undergo complex treatments, like chemotherapy, would have chips implanted.

But the chip's possible use to track people's movements - in addition to speeding delivery of medical information to emergency rooms - has raised alarm in some quarters.

VOICE-OVER:

With the pinch of a syringe, the microchip is inserted under the skin.

The procedure takes less than 20 minutes and requires no stitches.

It's little bigger than a grain of rice, but the VeriChip could revolutionise the way doctors access patient information.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
"It's put into a small glass capsule and it is injected into your body just like a shot of penicillin, as I mentioned previously there's a product on it called biobond that immediately upon injection forms a pseudo-scar tissue inside your skin so that the skin doesn't migrate, there's no power source in the chip, it lies dormant underneath your skin for years, and it's only awakened when a scanner is waved over the area where the chip is implanted."
SUPER CAPTION: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions

The dormant chip contains no medical records, just a security code.

Doctors can use the code to access a database that holds the patient's medical information, including allergies and prior treatment.

The electronic database, not the chip, would be updated after each visit.

But privacy advocates fear the technology could undermine confidentiality or be used to track a patient's movements.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
"The chip itself does not have any location technology capabilities such such GPS. The product is tiny, it's the size of a grain of rice. Today it is impossible to put a GPS receiver and a GPS transmitter inside the product the size of a grain of rice. The chip itself is purely for identification, only holds a 16 digit code for you, that is your identification number."
SUPER CAPTION: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions

Applied Digital Solutions, the company behind the chip, acknowledged that the technology could be used for other purposes, including security.

SOUNDBITE: (English)
SUPER CAPTION: Scott Silverman, CEO, Applied Digital Solutions

Critics say that to protect patient privacy, the devices should reveal only vital medical information, such as blood type and allergies.



You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/1cf231abd15b96b5275093ae3b61e934
Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

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